Lunchtime Links: August 23, 2010

By Peter Elliott | Everyday Christian Editor

Posted 12:00 pm on August 23, 2010

Blogs | News Briefs


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The Iowa-based national egg recall is expanding.

 

Commandos shot and killed a former policeman who was holding 15 tourists hostage aboard a bus in downtown Manila on Monday.

There are traffic jams and then there’s this: a 60-mile backup on China’s most travelled expressway due to construction.

Chicago Sun-Times religion columnist Cathleen Falsani is drawing a lot of attention for a 2004 interview with President Obama when he was an Illinois State Senator. “To me, it was a marvelous portrait of this man of a really humble faith.”

Flooding in Pakistan is of almost unimaginable proportions and aid is slow to arrive.

Dueling rallies over the proposed mosque near Ground Zero took place in Manhattan.

Veteran manager Lou Piniella accelerated his planned retirement and left the Chicago Cubs a month before the end of the season Sunday to be with his gravely ill mother.

 

Tags: egg recall, Ground Zero mosque, Lou Piniella, Lunchtime Links, Pakistan flooding




about the author:
Peter Elliott
http://www.everydaychristian.com

Peter Elliott is a veteran news and sports journalist. He enjoys interviewing others about how God works in their lives and sharing that with readers. He is also a lifelong, long-suffering Chicago Cubs fan. He resides in Indianapolis with his wife and three sons.

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